These guidance articles are peer reviewed and provided to give research teams high quality and trustworthy information on how to conduct a task or resolve an issue in the design, conduct or reporting of a clinical trial. Articles are accompanied by resources, such as a template or example documents. These are free for you to download and adapt for your study. Please acknowledge www.globalhealthtrials.org if you use these.

Twitter plays role in information distribution during emergencies, and it is widely used by public health organisations during public health crises.

11th December 2015 • comment

New guidelines help researchers undertaking systematic reviews and IPD meta-analyses to report their findings in a full and transparent manner.

13th July 2015 • comment

In celebration of Global Health Trials' fifth birthday (May 11th 2015) Professor Trudie Lang, Principal Investigator of the programme, talks to us about why Global Health Trials was started, why people should share their experience, and what the future holds.

8th May 2015 • comment

This WHO policy brief is part of a series on six global nutrition targets for 2025. This brief covers the third target: a 30% reduction in low birth weight. The purpose of the brief is to increase attention to, investment in, and action for a set of cost effective interventions and policies that can help WHO Member States and their partners in reducing rates of low birth weight. INTERGROWTH-21st Chief Investigators Stephen Kennedy and Jose Villar provided expert review of these strategies, contributing the unique perspective that data from the Project, and the resulting growth standards and tools as part of overall strategies for reducing rates of low birth weight in settings across the globe. The  full policy brief series can be found here: http://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/globaltargets2025_policybrief_overview/en/

23rd January 2015 • comment
14th January 2015 • comment

In this collection of papers researchers dismiss the Omran model as relevant to contemporary developing countries and suggest the foundation for a new framework better suited for guiding and understanding past and future epidemiological changes within these populations.

22nd May 2014 • comment

The University of Oxford's Emerging Markets Symposium convened a gathering of health and nutrition experts, leading economists, and policymakers to discuss actionable priorities for improving maternal and child health and nutrition in emerging market countries. Universal adoption of the INTERGROWTH-21st Project's new global indicators at birth to capture differences in population-level nutritional and environmental exposures during pregnancy was one of their recommendations. http://ems.gtc.ox.ac.uk/sites/ems.gtc.ox.ac.uk/files/findings_and_recommendations_ems2014.pdf

15th May 2014 • comment

Research ethics is strictly interrelated to scientific and methodological standards: a research project involving human participants is never ethical, if it is not scientifically and methodologically sound in the first place.

17th March 2014 • comment

A systematic review of barriers to and facilitators of the use of evidence by policymakers (BMC article)

by Kathryn Oliver, Simon Innvar, Theo Lorenc, Jenny woodman, James Thomas

The gap between research and practice or policy is often described as a problem. To identify new barriers of and facilitators to the use of evidence by policymakers, and assess the state of research in this area, the authors present a systematic review.

10th January 2014 • comment

This guide, developed by the WHO and released in December 2013, aims to facilitate implementation research in LMICs.

2nd December 2013 • comment

We share a brief on the MCL shared at at the Women Deliver Conference 2013.

4th June 2013 • comment