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Training and Resouces in Research Ethics Evaluation

TRREE is a multi-lingual web-based training program and capacity building initiative on the ethics of research involving humans. It is headed by a consortium of interested persons from Northern and Southern countries.

This site provides free-of-charge and open access to:

•e-Learning: a distance learning program and certification on research ethics evaluation &
•e-Resources: a participatory web-site with international, regional and national regulatory and policy resources
TRREE’s learning material is currently available in English, French, German and, shortly, in Portuguese.

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Bookmarked by The Editorial Team on 15 Nov 2011

Conducting good, ethical global health research is now more important than ever. Increased global mobility and connectivity mean that in today’s world there is no such thing as ‘local health’. As a collection, these stories offer a flexible resource for training across a variety of contexts, such as medical research organizations, universities, collaborative sites, and NGOs. 

12th November 2017 • comment

Are students kidding with health research ethics? The case of HIV/AIDS research in Cameroon

by Nchangwi S Munung, Godfrey B Tangwa, Chi P Che, Laurent Vidal, Odile Ouwe-Missi-Oukem-Boyer

Universities in Cameroon are playing an active part in HIV/AIDS research and much of this research is carried out by students, usually for the purpose of a dissertation/thesis. Student theses/dissertations present research findings in a much more comprehensive manner and have been described as the stepping-stone of a budding scientist's potential in becoming an independent researcher. It is therefore important to verify how students handle issues of research ethics.

15th August 2012 • comment

The border between Thailand and Burma (Myanmar) is at the forefront of the global battle against malaria, and is an important site for research.

25th May 2012 • comment

Health researchers working in low-resource settings often encounter serious unmet health needs among participants. What is the nature and extent of researchers’ obligations to respond to such needs? Competing accounts have been proposed, but there is no independent standard by which to assess them or to guide future inquiry. I propose an independent standard and demonstrate its use.

19th March 2012 • comment