BUILDING TERATOVIGILANCE CAPACITY IN AFRICA
9-11 October 2017
HOSTED BY THE CENTRE FOR INFECTIOUS DISEASE EPIDEMIOLOGY & RESEARCHIN THE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH & FAMILY MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF CAPE TOWN
Topics include:


  • Principles of Teratology

  • Emerging Teratogens in Africa

  • Epidemiology & Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies

  • and much more…


There is growing appreciation of the need to collect information on the safety of medicines and vaccines in pregnancy, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Maternal and neonatal pharmacovigilance (teratovigilance) in the African context requires innovation of research and surveillance approaches based on sound clinical and epidemiological principles.
Concerns about the safety of novel antiretrovirals, antituberculosis agents, antimalarials and antibiotics in pregnancy have prompted the creation of an international pregnancy exposure registry database by WHO and various initiatives aimed at building teratovigilance capacity in the Africa, and South Africa in particular.
This 3-day interactive workshop aims to provide participants with exposure to international experts who will provide up-to-date knowledge on teratovigilance.
COURSE OBJECTIVES
By the end of this course, participants will:

  • be able to analyse and apply the basic principles of teratology and pharmaco-epidemiology to investigate whether an exposure poses a potential risk to the mother and fetus at an individual and at a population level.

  • gain up-to-date information on various relevant teratogens.

  • gain knowledge and skills required to design and implement teratogen surveillance systems in a resource-limited setting.

  • understand the importance and clinical application of product labelling around safety of medicines during pregnancy.

  • develop a network of African researchers, clinicians, regulators and policymakers to build capacity for protection of pregnant women and their infants.


http://www.buildingteratovigilance.co.za/

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